More than 90% of the wine lands of Spain will no longer be optimal for the usual varieties



Con el cambio climático, los viñedos de regiones tan al norte como la isla de Vancouver (como el de la imagen) podrán albergar más variedades de uva.
With climate change, vineyards in regions as far north as Vancouver Island (like the one in the picture) will be able to house more grape varieties.

With climate change, vineyards in regions as far north as Vancouver Island (like the one in the picture) will be able to house more grape varieties.
With climate change, vineyards in regions as far north as Vancouver Island (like the one in the picture) will be able to house more grape varieties. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
If winemakers want Rioja, Jumilla or Bordeaux wines to be made in the same place, they will have to change grapes. A study confirms that climate change threatens to turn the geography of wine production upside down in a few decades. In countries like Spain or Italy, more than 90% of the optimal lands for the cultivation of the vine will cease to be. Meanwhile, vineyards begin to abound in the United Kingdom. However, the exchange of traditional varieties for more resilient varieties could help designations of origin to avoid warming.


The phenology of the vines, particularly those dedicated to the production of wine (Vitis vinifera subspecies vinifera) has three essential moments: sprouting, flowering and envero (when the green grape becomes ink or white). With decades of phenological data from 11 of the main grape varieties or cultivars, a group of scientists has modeled the impact of climate change on the map of wine production. If nothing is done, it could be devastating.

The study, published in the scientific journal PNAS, starts from the current situation of lands dedicated to viticulture, from those of Burgundy to those of California. Even in compliance with the Paris Agreements, that is, maintaining the temperature rise below 2º, 56% of the traditional regions will no longer be suitable for wine production. As is happening with other wild species of plants and animals, warming will open new areas increasingly north to the vineyards, but will not compensate for losses.

 

 

Penedés winemakers are already producing on the slopes of the Pirinero while French producers have planted vineyards in England

“There are already Penedés winemakers who have moved their production to the Pyrenees or French producers who have emigrated to southern England,” recalls the researcher at the University of Alcalá de Henares and principal author of the study Ignacio Morales.

Heating is not a simple linear increase in temperatures. As the latest studies have shown, it is concretized in a lengthening of the summer, in the rise of the maximum and minimum temperatures or in the multiplication of the days of extreme heat. All this alters the production of sugars and acids in the fruit. “In Australia, the advancement of ripening is making the grape have more sugars and less acids than would be desirable,” says Morales. And, to avoid the high alcohol content, they are correcting it by adding tartaric acid to the broth.

But there is still room. The diversity of V. vinifera vinifera itself has exposed it to a great climatic diversity, which has generated a great thermal amplitude and rainfall regime according to the cultivar, which has allowed the development of varieties capable of measuring in the northern cold of Germany, in the humidity of New Zealand or the heat of the mezzogiorno of Italy. The study shows that playing with the varieties of late maturation, such as Garnacha or Monastrell, a good part of the current regions could continue to make good wine at the end of the century. Meanwhile, those of early maturation, such as pinot noir, could be planted in the new lands increasingly north.

 

Sobre el mapa global del vino, aparecen las regiones vitivinícolas de Europa. En verde, zonas que ganarán variedades y, en azules morados, las que más pierden.
The wine regions of Europe appear on the global wine map. In green, areas that will gain varieties and, in purple blues, the ones that lose the most.. IGNACIO MORALES-CASTILLA


The wine regions of Europe appear on the global wine map. In green, areas that will gain varieties and, in purple blues, the ones that lose the most
“We have found that, by changing to other varieties, wine growers can reduce the damage to only 24% of the lost area,” says a researcher at the University of British Columbia (Canada) and senior author of the Elizabeth Wolkovich study. “For example, in Burgundy, in France, producers could consider sowing more heat-tolerant varieties such as syrah or grenache to replace the dominant pinot noir. And farmers in regions such as Bordeaux could substitute cabernet sauvignon and merlot for monastrell, “he adds.

For Spain, Morales clarifies that the results have been made at a scale and resolution that do not allow reducing the focus to the regional level. But, across the country, “our models predict increases in suitability for later varieties such as monastrell, garnacha and syrah.” Precisely, it is already in a second phase of its study to detect Spanish varieties that, by phenology or resistance, better carry the heat of each region.

For Spain, Morales clarifies that the results have been made at a scale and resolution that do not allow reducing the focus to the regional level. But, across the country, “our models predict increases in suitability for later varieties such as monastrell, garnacha and syrah.” Precisely, it is already in a second phase of its study to detect Spanish varieties that, by phenology or resistance, better carry the heat of each region.

To continue on their land, many growers will have to go to late grapes, such as the Sirah or Garnacha

But the use of the most resilient varieties has a limit. This research warns that, in a high-emission scenario, with a projection of an average thermal increase of 4º, up to 85% of the current lands dedicated to the vineyard will no longer be optimal. Even resorting to the toughest grapes, more than half of the vineyard areas could be lost. As Morales recalls, “red and later grapes can be planted in Sweden.” Another thing is the quality of the wine that comes out of there.

For Spain, Morales clarifies that the results have been made at a scale and resolution that do not allow reducing the focus to the regional level. But, across the country, “our models predict increases in suitability for later varieties such as monastrell, garnacha and syrah.” Precisely, it is already in a second phase of its study to detect Spanish varieties that, by phenology or resistance, better carry the heat of each region.

To continue on their land, many growers will have to go to late grapes, such as the Sirah or Garnacha

But the use of the most resilient varieties has a limit. This research warns that, in a high-emission scenario, with a projection of an average thermal increase of 4º, up to 85% of the current lands dedicated to the vineyard will no longer be optimal. Even resorting to the toughest grapes, more than half of the vineyard areas could be lost. As Morales recalls, “red and later grapes can be planted in Sweden.” Another thing is the quality of the wine that comes out of there.

source: elpais

El vino emigra empujado por el calentamiento

Más del 90% de las tierras del vino de España dejarán de ser óptimas para las variedades de siempre

27 ENE 2020 – 21:00 CET

Con el cambio climático, los viñedos de regiones tan al norte como la isla de Vancouver (como el de la imagen) podrán albergar más variedades de uva.
Con el cambio climático, los viñedos de regiones tan al norte como la isla de Vancouver (como el de la imagen) podrán albergar más variedades de uva. UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA BRITÁNICA

Si los viticultores quieren que el Rioja, los vinos de Jumilla o el Burdeos se hagan en el mismo sitio tendrán que cambiar de uvas. Un estudio confirma que el cambio climático amenaza con poner patas arriba la geografía de la producción de vino en unas décadas. En países como España o Italia, más del 90% de las tierras óptimas para el cultivo de la vid dejarán de serlo. Mientras, empiezan a abundar los viñedos en Reino Unido. Sin embargo, el cambio de las variedades tradicionales por otras más resilientes podría ayudar a las denominaciones de origen  a esquivar el calentamiento.

La fenología de las vides, en particular la de las dedicadas a la producción de vino (Vitis vinifera subespecie vinifera) tiene tres momentos esenciales: brotación, floración y envero (cuando la uva verde pasa a tinta o blanca). Con décadas de datos fenológicos de 11 de las principales variedades de uva o cultivares, un grupo de científicos ha modelado el impacto del cambio climático en el mapa de la producción del vino. Si no se hace nada, podría ser devastador.

El estudio, publicado en la revista científica PNAS, parte de la situación actual de las tierras dedicadas a la viticultura, desde las de la Borgoña hasta las de California. Aún cumpliendo con los Acuerdos de París, es decir, manteniendo el aumento de las temperaturas por debajo de los 2º, el 56% de las regiones tradicionales dejarán de ser aptas para la producción de vino. Como está sucediendo con otras especies silvestres de plantas y animales, el calentamiento abrirá nuevas zonas cada vez más al norte a las viñas,  pero no compensarán las pérdidas.

Viticultores del Penedés ya están produciendo en las faldas del Pirinero mientras que productores franceses han plantado viñedos en Inglaterra

“Ya hay bodegueros del Penedés que han trasladado su producción al Pirineo o productores franceses que han emigrado al sur de Inglaterra”, recuerda el investigador de la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares y principal autor del estudio Ignacio Morales.

El calentamiento no es un simple aumento lineal de las temperaturas. Como vienen demostrando los últimos estudios, se concreta en un alargamiento del verano, en la subida de las temperaturas máximas y mínimas o en la multiplicación de los días de calor extremo. Todo esto altera la producción de los azúcares y ácidos en el fruto. “En Australia, el adelanto de la maduración está haciendo que la uva tenga más azúcares y menos ácidos de lo que sería deseable”, comenta Morales. Y, para evitar el alto contenido alcohólico, lo están corrigiendo añadiendo ácido tartárico al caldo.

Pero aún hay margen. La propia diversidad de la V. vinifera vinifera la ha expuesto a una gran diversidad climática, lo que ha generado una gran amplitud térmica y régimen de precipitaciones según el cultivar, lo que ha permitido el desarrollo de variedades capaces de medrar en el frío norte de Alemania, en la humedad de Nueva Zelanda o el calor del mezzogiorno de Italia. El estudio muestra que jugando con las variedades de maduración tardía, como la garnacha o la monastrell, buena parte de las regiones actuales podrían seguir haciendo bueno vino a finales de siglo. Mientras, las de maduración temprana, como la pinot noir, se podrían plantar en las nuevas tierras cada vez más al norte.

Sobre el mapa global del vino, aparecen las regiones vitivinícolas de Europa. En verde, zonas que ganarán variedades y, en azules morados, las que más pierden.
Sobre el mapa global del vino, aparecen las regiones vitivinícolas de Europa. En verde, zonas que ganarán variedades y, en azules morados, las que más pierden. IGNACIO MORALES-CASTILLA

“Hemos comprobado que, cambiando a otras variedades, los viticultores pueden reducir el daño hasta solo el 24% del área perdida”, asegura en una nota la investigadora de la Universidad de Columbia Británica (Canadá) y autora sénior del estudio Elizabeth Wolkovich. “Por ejemplo, en Borgoña, en Francia, los productores podrían plantearse sembrar variedades más tolerantes al calor como la syrah o la garnacha para reemplazar la dominante pinot noir. Y los agricultores de regiones como Burdeos podrían sustituir la cabernet sauvignon y la merlot por la monastrell”, añade.

Para España, Morales aclara que los resultados se han hecho a una escala y resolución que no permiten reducir el foco hasta lo regional. Pero, a escala de todo el país, “nuestros modelos predicen aumentos de idoneidad para las variedades más tardías como monastrell, garnacha y syrah”. Precisamente, ya está en una segunda fase de su estudio para detectar las variedades españolas que, por fenología o resistencia, mejor lleven el calor de cada región.

Para seguir en sus tierras, muchos cosecheros tendrán que pasarse a uvas tardías, como la sirah o la garnacha

Pero el recurso a las variedades más resilientes tiene un límite. Esta investigación advierte que, en un escenario de altas emisiones, con una proyección de un aumento térmico medio de 4º, hasta el 85% de las tierras actuales dedicadas a la viña dejarán de ser óptimas. Aún recurriendo a las uvas más resistentes, más de la mitad de las áreas de viñedos se podrían perder. Como recuerda Morales, “se podrán plantar uvas tintas y más tardías en Suecia”. Otra cosa es la calidad del vino que salga de allí.

fuente: elpais

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *